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  1. How Do Muscle and Fat Develop? OARDC Scientist Honored for Findings in Animals, People

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/how-do-muscle-and-fat-develop-oardc-scientist-honored-findings-animals-people

    Ohio State. Lee conducts research on food animal nutrition, physiology, tissue biology and processing ... muscle and adipose, or fat, tissue. “Lee’s findings offer considerable potential to improve animal ... expression of candidate genes in fat and muscle tissue can benefit animal production, a nominator noted. Lee ...

  2. OSU Extension: Fall Frost Increases the Potential for Toxicity in Livestock

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/osu-extension-fall-frost-increases-potential-toxicity-livestock

    convert quickly to prussic acid in freeze-damaged plant tissue, Sulc said. “Animals can die within minutes ... tissue.” The signs of prussic acid poisoning appear rapidly after the animal eats forage high in prussic ... in the plant tissue soon after a frost,” he said. “Ruminants are more susceptible to prussic acid ...

  3. OARDC Scientist Earns International Poultry Group Honor

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/oardc-scientist-earns-international-poultry-group-honor

    fundamental science that advances the field of poultry science. A professor of animal sciences based at Ohio ... extracellular matrix gene expression. The extracellular matrix, connective tissues and fibers located outside of ... maintaining tissue function. Velleman has investigated the regulation of muscle growth and structure by the ...

  4. Lawn Maintenance Made Easy

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/lawn-maintenance-made-easy

    lies in three cultural practices: watering, mowing and fertilizing. "The most common mistake I see ... becoming more susceptible to diseases, or stops regenerating new leaf tissue, eventually creating a sparse ... is due to the way the light reflects off the leaf tissue. The saying "less is more" applies ...

  5. Down-Under Digestive Microbes Could Help Lower Methane Gas From Livestock

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/down-under-digestive-microbes-could-help-lower-methane-gas-livestock

    July 1, 2011   Study is authored by Ohio State animal scientist Mark Morrison and appears in the ... wallaby gut is responsible for keeping the animal’s methane emissions relatively low suggests a potential ... digestible energy intake than do livestock animals. Scientists have used DNA sequence data to devise a way to ...

  6. Intensive Berry Training Program Being Offered to Midwest Growers

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/intensive-berry-training-program-being-offered-midwest-growers

    development, insect and disease growth and development, weeds and soils, cross-cultural education, principles ... fungicides and herbicides, leadership training, soil and plant tissue sampling techniques, and monitoring and ...

  7. New Vaccine Candidate Shows Strong Potential to Prevent Highly Contagious Norovirus

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/new-vaccine-candidate-shows-strong-potential-prevent-highly-contagious-norovirus

    virus cannot grow in cell cultures, and no small animal models exist to mimic the infection. Without the ... vomiting-- can generate a strong immune response in mice without appearing to cause the animals any harm. ... this vaccine design method's effectiveness against the human norovirus. Animals receiving the ...

  8. Ohio State Scientists to Share in $25 Million Grant to Study Virus-Related Foodborne Illness

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/ohio-state-scientists-share-25-million-grant-study-virus-related-foodborne-illness

    plans to use animal cells in an attempt to grow the human norovirus in culture. "That's the ... university professor in the Food Animal Health Research Program at Ohio State University's Ohio ... "The human norovirus can't be grown in cell culture-- outside the human body-- so that's ...

  9. Rumen Expert, Microbe Namesake, Notches 2008 OARDC Senior Faculty Research Award

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/rumen-expert-microbe-namesake-notches-2008-oardc-senior-faculty-research-award

    recognition in a dark, wet, hard-to-see field.   A professor in the Department of Animal Sciences, Dehority ... said. The rumen is the first of four chambers in the stomach of ruminants, or cud-chewing animals ... . Billions of microbes may live there. They break down cellulose, the main part of plant tissue, and make it ...

  10. Prion Test Would Allow Early Detection of Mad Cow, Other TSEs

    https://news-archive.cfaes.ohio-state.edu/news-release/prion-test-would-allow-early-detection-mad-cow-other-tses

    spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in live animals,” said Sreevatsan, a scientist with the Food Animal ... clinical samples such as blood, serum or lymphoid tissues before the onset of symptoms. The abnormal form ... animals and humans.  “The idea is to detect the prion protein, which is folded abnormally as compared ...

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